Archive | July, 2012

Cream

31 Jul

With a group like Cream, it’s difficult to know where to start. In 1966, Eric Clapton was widely considered one of the best guitar players in rock ‘n’ roll, and after he left the Yardbirds, he got hooked up with Ginger Baker, a phenomenal drummer himself. After the two jammed together, Baker asked Clapton if he wanted to form a new group. Clapton agreed, but only on the condition that bassist Jack Bruce—who he had played with in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and Powerhouse—be brought on board as well.”

In 1966, Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker play under the Cream moniker for the first time. It’s at the 6th Annual National Jazz & Blues Festival in Windsor. Cream made its unofficial debut,under their individual names at the Twisted Wheel on 29 July 1966.[3][20]  Creams official debut came two nights later at the Sixth Annual Windsor Jazz & Blues Festival.[3][20] They performed blues reworkings that thrilled the large crowd and earned  a warm reception. In October the band also got a chance to jam with Jimi Hendrix, who had recently arrived in London. Hendrix was a fan of Clapton’s music, and wanted a chance to play with him onstage.[3] Hendrix was introduced to Cream through Chas Chandler, Hendrix’s manager.[3]

Advertisements

Wild Thing!

30 Jul

Wild thing, I think I love you.” According to the Billboard pop chart, “Wild Thing” by the  Troggs, is the top song in the U.S. on July 30,1966.

Wild Thing” is a song written by New York City-born songwriter Chip Taylor. Originally recorded by The Wild Ones in 1965,[1] “Wild Thing” is best known for its 1966 cover by the English band The Troggs, which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in July 1966. The song peaked at number 2 in Britain.

The Troggs version of “Wild Thing” is ranked #257 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The Troggs

The original release with Jordan Christoper and the Wild Ones.

The infamous Jimi Hendrix cover at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967.

The Mysterious “Motorcycle Crash”

29 Jul

On July 29, 1966, something happened to Bob Dylan while he was riding his motorcycle near his Woodstock, New York, home. Forty years and a small library of biographies later, it’s still hard to be much more precise or detailed than that. What really befell Dylan on that day remains, like so much in this pop-culture icon’s closely guarded life, cloaked in mystery.

What ever the true story may be, his music changed  and the touring stopped after this event. The burning fury of Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde went to a more sparse , quieter sound of 1968’s John Wesley Harding and 1969’s Nashville Skyline. He stayed off the road until 1974, when he toured with the same players who had backed him on the 1965-66 tour; they had since become famous as the Band.

Help!

29 Jul

On July 29,1965, The Beatles second film, Help!, premieres at the London Pavilion.

The trailer.

The entire movie.

 

Rock and Roll Guitar starts with Chuck Berry and his First Hit in 1955!

27 Jul

Maybellene is a song recorded by Chuck Berry, adapted from the traditional fiddle tune “Ida Red” that tells the story of a hot rod race and a broken romance. It was released in July 1955 as a single on Chess Records of Chicago, Illinois.[1] It was Berry’s first single release and his first hit. “Maybellene” is considered one of the pioneering rock and roll singles: Rolling Stone magazine wrote, “Rock & roll guitar starts here.”[2] The record is an early instance of the complete rock and roll package: youthful subject matter, small guitar-driven combo, clear diction, and an atmosphere of unrelenting excitement.

Beggars Banquet

26 Jul

July 26,1968

File:Beggar Banquet.jpg

The Rolling Stone  album “Beggar’s Banquet” has its release delayed because of their record label’s objection to the album’s cover design, which featured a graffiti-covered bathroom wall. Mick Jagger was furious. It was the first album on which Jagger played guitar.

Here are some of the details. By June, the sessions were nearly completed for the album in England, with some final overdubbing and mixing to be done in Los Angeles during July. However, both Decca Records in England and London Records in the US rejected the planned cover design – a graffiti-covered lavatory wall. The band initially refused to change the cover, resulting in several months’ delay in the release of the album. By November, however, the Rolling Stones gave in, allowing the album to be released in December with a simple white cover imitating an invitation card, complete with an RSVP. For those aware of the cover intrigue, an advertisement in the back of Rolling Stone magazine soon announced that “the Stones want you to have the banned cover” allowing completists to buy the original artwork as a full front and back album slick that they could glue or tape over the released version. Meanwhile, the idea of a plain album cover was also implemented by The Beatles for their eponymous white-sleeved double-album, which was released one month prior to Beggars Banquet. The similarity garnered widespread accusations of Beatle-esque imitation when Beggars Banquet was finally released. In 1984, the original cover art was released with the initial CD remastering of Beggars Banquet.

Bob Dylan goes ELECTRIC

25 Jul

Part of the story of the marriage between folk music and rock music is right here.

On the night of Sunday, July 25 1965, Dylan’s appearance was sandwiched between Cousin Emmy and the Sea Island singers, two decidedly traditional acts.[6] The band that went on stage to back Dylan included two musicians who had played on his recently released single, “Like a Rolling Stone“: Mike Bloomfield on lead guitar and Al Kooper on organ. Two of Bloomfield’s bandmates from the Paul Butterfield Blues Band also appeared at Newport: bassist Jerome Arnold and drummer Sam Lay, along with Barry Goldberg on piano.

Footage of Dylan’s Newport performance can be seen in the documentary films Festival (1967), No Direction Home (2005) and The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan Live at the Newport Folk Festival 1963-1965 (2007). The footage begins with Dylan being introduced by Master of Ceremonies Peter Yarrow: “Ladies and gentlemen, the person that’s going to come up now has a limited amount of time … His name is Bob Dylan.” In the documentary footage, the sound of both booing and cheering can be heard a few bars into Dylan’s first song, “Maggie’s Farm“, and continues throughout his second, “Like a Rolling Stone“. Dylan and his band then performed “Phantom Engineer”, an early version of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry“, but this song was omitted from The Other Side of the Mirror DVD.

After “Phantom Engineer”, Dylan and the band left the stage. The sound of booing and clapping can be heard in the background. When Peter Yarrow returned to the microphone, he begged Dylan to continue performing. According to Robert Shelton, when Dylan returned to the stage, he discovered he did not have the right harmonica and said to Yarrow, “What are you doing to me?”[7] Dylan then asked the audience for ‘an E harmonica’. Within a few moments, a clatter of harmonicas hit the stage. He then performed two songs on acoustic guitar for the audience: “Mr. Tambourine Man“, and then, as his farewell to Newport, “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue“. The crowd exploded with applause at the end, calling for more. Dylan did not return to the Newport festival for 37 years. In an enigmatic gesture, Dylan performed at Newport in 2002, sporting a wig and fake beard.[8]